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As Black people, we have to worry how our personal and political have the potential to affect our business. If we wear our hair a certain way, will we be perceived as militant? If we call out the very real problems of racism will it prevent us from partnering and working with mainstream companies.

 

If we speak up and out about Black causes, will people take it to mean that we hate White people? It’s a constant back and forth. Double consciousness, as DuBois said. But historically, that hasn’t been the case with White folks—not as it pertains to minorities and Black people specifically. Their covert or blatant racism wasn’t likely to prevent them from making money. In fact, this country was built on the foundation of racism making money for White men particularly.

But the times they are a changin’. While we still have a helluva long way to go, Black people are more empowered these days. And with companies taking more responsibility for their messaging, and Black people recognizing the power of their voice, racism won’t be tolerated.

A contractor learned that the hard way when he pulled up to a Black woman’s house to do some work. But when she saw the Confederate flag flying from the back of his car, she had to let him know that she didn’t feel comfortable with him working for her.

In what appears to be a security video, she walks out of her door and said, “Hi, you know what I do apologize I know you’ve come from a very long way but we’re going to use someone else.”

The man standing next to the woman says, “She’s upset with the flag.”

She said, “No, I’m beyond upset with the flag. You don’t need to take it down. You continue to believe what you need to believe sir, but no, I cannot pay you for your services. Have a good day.”

PHOTO: AP

 

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