Supreme Court

Today (June 30), Ketanji Brown Jackson made history after being sworn in as the first Black woman to serve on the Supreme Court.

Black activist Rev. Al Sharpton has stepped up to give his opinion on the Supreme Court's shocking ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Ginni Thomas, wife of Justice Clarence Thomas, gets heat for text messages asking Arizona lawmakers to overturn Trump's 2020 election loss.

It’s taken 233 years to arrive at this moment, the first Black woman nominated to be a justice on the Supreme Court, which once upheld racial segregation in America.

The U.S. Supreme Court quietly announced Monday that it would not review Bill Cosby’s sexual assault case, leaving him a free man and ending a two-decade legal drama that shifted the cultural landscape, destroyed the groundbreaking Black actor’s reputation, and sent him to prison for several years late in life.

Sen. Dick Durbin, the committee chairman, announced the hearing schedule on Wednesday as Jackson was holding her first meetings with senators on Capitol Hill.

President Joe Biden is expected to announce the nomination of Ketanji Brown Jackson of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to the United States Supreme Court

An African American retired federal judge from Alabama, first in the state's history to be exact, made it his mission to speak out in protest of the potential nomination of Black female Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to occupy Justice Stephen Breyer's soon-to-be-vacant seat on the Supreme Court.

As he struggled to survive the 2020 Democratic primary, Joe Biden made a striking pledge before voting began in heavily African American, must-win South Carolina: His first Supreme Court appointment would be a Black woman.

The Supreme Court’s conservative majority is allowing evictions to resume across the United States, blocking the Biden administration from enforcing a temporary ban that was put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Supreme Court decided unanimously Monday that the NCAA can’t enforce rules limiting education-related benefits — like computers and paid internships — that colleges offer to student-athletes, a ruling that could help push changes in how the student-athletes are compensated.

One of these legal scholars could change the make-up of the country's highest court.