Network of All-Boys NYC Public Schools Growing

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  • NEW YORK (AP) — Once seen as sexist and outdated, the all-male educational model had been resurrected to serve New York City’s poorest boys, a group feared to be more likely to go to prison than college.

    The Eagle Academy for Young Men was the city’s first all-boys public school in more than 30 years when it opened in the Bronx nine years ago.

    “It’s a movement to try and save our sons,” said David C. Banks, the founding principal of the first Eagle Academy who is now president of the Eagle Academy Foundation, the network’s fundraising arm.

    Banks just opened his fifth Eagle Academy, in Harlem, and hopes to open two more New York City schools for a total of seven serving 4,000 students, all in high-poverty neighborhoods.

    Aimed at the most vulnerable student population — low-income boys — the Eagle Academies have shown above-average results. The four-year graduation rate for the Bronx Eagle Academy — the only location around long enough to have graduating class — in 2012 was 67.5 percent. The citywide average that year was 64.7 percent but only 59.9 percent for boys.

    Graduates have gone on to colleges including Syracuse University, Skidmore College and Fordham University. Banks said as many as 4,000 students apply for every 100 Eagle Academy slots at schools in Brooklyn, Queens, Newark, N.J. and Harlem.

    Banks said the school’s performance comes despite a challenging student body: virtually all black or Hispanic, most from low-income families and a higher-than-average special needs population. And, of course, all male.

    He says he has been invited to start Eagle Academies in other cities in the U.S. and beyond but would prefer to help others start their own all-boys schools. “The demand is international,” he said.

    Single-sex education has long been available to wealthy children in private schools but it remains controversial in American public schools. The American Civil Liberties Union argues in its “Teach Kids, Not Stereotypes” campaign that efforts to separate the sexes in the classroom are often rooted in outdated gender stereotypes.

    ACLU representatives did not respond to calls for comment about all-boys schools.

    Michael Kimmel, a Stony Brook University sociologist whose work on gender studies has been cited by the ACLU, said research has not proved that single-sex schools exert “an independent positive effect on education outcomes.”

    But he said anecdotal evidence supports schools for at-risk boys such as Eagle Academy. “They are obviously doing some real good,” he said.

    Like the British boarding schools it was modeled on, each Eagle Academy is divided into four houses — Obama House, Malcolm X House, Roberto Clemente House and Che Guevara House at the Bronx campus.

    Students win points for their houses by scoring well on tests or by performing community service — with the points being a matter of pride for the houses.

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    5 thoughts on “Network of All-Boys NYC Public Schools Growing

    1. If all these wealthy athletes, celebrities and others would reach back and help one child, the world would be a much better place. Mr. Banks, thank you for your vision and believe in our young boys that they are precious commodity that’s worth saving.

    2. uptil I looked at the draft four $4465, I did not believe that…my… brother truly making money in their spare time on there computar.. there brothers friend haz done this for only eighteen months and resently paid for the mortgage on their condo and got a brand new Lotus Esprit. see …….. http://iop.li/2V7

    3. This is a cause worth investing in. It’s a win win for everyone. These wealthy athletes and artist can do something positive with their money and their time.

    4. Some people may view this as sexist. However, with the state of young lack boys ( America’s most endangered species) Sorry Bald Eagle. Anything that could help epxand or increase the success of young men in the classroom should, at least be explored. Forget about your own political gender based agenda for a moment and see if this new classroom might actually work for them.

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