Dr. Sampson Davis turns 45 today, a far cry from the rough and tumble days living as a boy in Newark, New Jersey. The emergency room physician famously made a pact with two high school friends, with all three of them becoming doctors.

Davis grew up the fifth of six children in a cramped space, dodging the crime and such that surrounded his family. Although he was a gifted magnet school student in high school, the pull of the streets was equally as strong. Living in both worlds, Davis engaged in petty crime and was arrested at 17. Had Davis been five months older, he would have faced trial for a felony charge as an adult.

After returning from juvenile detention, Davis, fellow University High students and friends Rameck Hunt and George Jenkins made a pact with one another to put their heads to the books. All three of them were admitted to Seton Hall University, and afterwards, all three entered medical school. Known collectively as “The Three Doctors,” the trio detailed their story in a best-selling book, The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise and Fulfill a Dream.”

Dr. Jenkins went on to become a dentist, a lifelong dream of his, and also serves as the Assistant Professor of Clinical Dentistry at Columbia University. Dr. Hunt became a physician like Dr. Davis, and is also a professor at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Dr. Davis is a board-certified emergency medicine physician who has worked across New Jersey. All three men have written other books, and also lecture across the nation.

PHOTO: Sampson Davis promotional

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3 thoughts on “Little Known Black History Fact: Sampson Davis

  1. Congratulations to the three doctors. Setting goals and obtaining them is a beautiful thing. Setting goals with others and obtaining them is an absolutely great way to be held accountable while putting in the work to achieve common goals is beautiful too.

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