Golden State Warriors' Quinn Cook (4) warms up with teammate Kevin Durant (35) before their NBA game against the Brooklyn Nets at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif. on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

Source: MediaNews Group/Bay Area News via Getty Images / Getty

While it wasn’t common knowledge except for only the most studious basketball fan, Prince George’s County in the state of Maryland has produced a significant number of talented players. In a new documentary, Basketball County: In The Water, the Washington, D.C. suburb and the basketball stars that hail from the region are highlighted much to the delight of area natives.

Executive produced by NBA players and county natives Kevin Durant, Quinn Cook, and Victor Oladipo, Basketball County: In The Water aired Friday night (May 15) on the Showtime network. Directed by John Beckham and Jimmy Jenkins, the documentary highlights the previously little-known but rich tradition of basketball that has been in motion in the shadows of the Nation’s Capital for years.

Along with the aforementioned Durant, Cook, and Oladipo, the documentary speaks with former stars such as Steve Francis and Walt Williams, both of whom starred at the University of Maryland at College Park. The documentary also turns to the tragic tale of the late Len Bias, who was well on his way to NBA superstardom but died from a cocaine overdose just two days after the Boston Celtics selected in the first round with the second pick.

Michael Beasley, Jeff Green, Jerami and Jerai Grant, and Jarrett Jack are current NBA players who also got some shine in the documentary. Since its airing, folks on Twitter have been beaming with P.G. County pride and we’ve collected some of those reactions below.

Basketball County: In The Water can be exclusively seen on Showtime.

Check out the official first look and trailer videos below.

Photo: Getty

Showtime’s ‘Basketball County: In The Water’ Doc Reps P.G. County’s Hoops Legacy  was originally published on hiphopwired.com

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