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HERE ARE SOME OF THE BIGGEST HEADLINES IN 2022 & WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ON THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29TH, 2022

 

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1. Buffalo Mass Murder at the Intersection of Expansive Racism and Disappearing Gun Control

 

Buffalo Lawyer Representing Tops Victims Families Sues Gun Manufacturer

Source: The Washington Post / Getty

What You Need to Know:

“What started out as a beautiful day in the city of Buffalo has turned into a terrible day-and one of tremendous heartbreak for every member of our community.”

With those words, Mayor Byron Brown opened his press conference about the racially motivated mass murder at a Buffalo, NY grocery store Saturday afternoon. The shooting in which at least 10 people were killed and 3 wounded, was allegedly carried out by an 18-year old White man, who may have scoped out the area as he “went looking for a lot of Black people.”

11 of the shooting victims were Black people, and 2 were White. TOPS is the only grocery store serving the predominantly Black neighborhood on Buffalo’s east side.

 

2. Amanda Gorman to United Nations “I Dare You To Do Good”

 

 

Los Angeles Times Festival Of Books

Source: David Livingston / Getty

WRITTEN & CONTRIBUTED BY KHAMERON RILEY

What You Need to Know:

American poet Amanda Gorman and South Korean pop band Blackpink called for climate action Monday as world leaders descend on New York City for the United Nations General Assembly this week.

Taking the General Assembly stage on Monday, Gorman read her latest poem, “An Ode We Owe,” urging action on poverty, world hunger, gender equality, and climate change.

“We chime it, for the climate, for our communities. We shall respect and protect every part of this planet, Hand it to every heart on this earth, until no one’s worth is rendered, by the race, gender, class, or identity, they were born. This morn let it be sworn, that we are one human kin, grounded not just by the griefs, we bear, but by the good we begin,” the 24-year-old poet recited in her address.

 

3. Florida High Court OKs Grand Jury Probe of COVID-19 Vaccines

 

 

A sign advertising flu and COVID-19 testing is seen in front...

Source: SOPA Images / Getty

What You Need to Know:

New Jersey Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy said Monday his administration has launched a promised review of its handling of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The administration hired regional law firm Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads — which has offices in the state as well as Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New York — along with management consulting firm Boston Consulting Group to conduct the review, Murphy said in a statement Monday.

The review is expected to end with a report in late 2023, the governor said.

 

4. Lone Black Man at Party Wrongfully Incarcerated

 

Shot of a prison cell with a lattice door

Source: Wirestock / Getty

WRITTEN AND CONTRIBUTED BY COY MALONE

What You Need to Know:

In 2008, Emmanuel Fair was named as the lead suspect in the murder of a 24-year-old Indian immigrant woman named Arpana Jinaga following a Halloween party in Redmond City, WA that ended in sexual assault and strangulation. Local authorities focused on Fair because he was the only Black man at the party, along with his past criminal record.

He was arrested in 2010 and was housed in the King County jail for eight years, seven months, and 14 days without being convicted of a crime. “I’ve never seen a worse case,” says Corinne Sebren, one of Fair’s lawyers. “There’s very little justice left to salvage.”

 

5. As Winter Approaches, Seasonal Depression May Set in For Millions

 

A lonely bench on the bank of the frozen lake

Source: MAKSYM BOSATSKYI / Getty

WRITTEN & CONTRIBUTED BY APRYLETE RUSSELL

What You Need to Know:

Winter’s coming. The leaves have fallen, temperatures are dropping and there’s less daylight to brighten our moods.

While some enjoy the changing of the seasons, millions of U.S. adults will experience a form of depression during the winter months known as a seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. It can feel just like regular depression because it is, said Thea Gallagher, a clinical assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at New York University Grossman School of Medicine/NYU Langone in New York City.