Bill O’Reilly‘s comments about Beyonce‘s new “Partition” song/video suggest she is setting a bad example for Black women. “The Rickey Smiley Morning Show” discuss how they feel and get caller’s opinions. Listen to the audio player to hear what they had to say.

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9 thoughts on “Is Beyonce Setting A Bad Example For Black Women?

  1. As a wife and a mother, the problem is not the idea of exuding sex appeal. It’s the crude, over-the-top exhibitionism that is off-putting. As the group En Vogue proved, sex appeal and class are not mutually exclusive. Beyonce has called herself a feminist, so she has opened herself up to being scrutinized. I, for one, see her as an entertainer and a savvy businesswoman, rather than as a feminist. The idea of owning one’s sexuality is not an original one, and it doesn’t involve public vulgarity. Since her husband, Jay Z, is a known misogynist, with his lyrics that call women’s b’s and h’s, I wonder how much, if any, influence he exerts on the way she presents herself. In terms of feminism, her songs send mixed messages to impressionable young girls who look up to her. One one hand, some of them are about female empowerment, but others like “Partition” are simply vulgar and undermine the point about that empowerment. At 32, she’s closer to 40 than she is to 20, and her own daughter will be looking to her as an example as she grows up. Beyonce won’t be able to pull off this kind of act forever, since she will inevitably age like everyone else. There are things we can’t do and still keep our dignity, especially as we age. It will be interesting to see where she’ll be at 40, 50, and even 60. As for role models, there are plenty of well-known and unknown black women who carry themselves with dignity and class, who are just as pretty as she is, and who do things that make a difference for the better in the lives they touch. There are too many to name in this post, but there is no shortage of role models for black girls to follow.

  2. If we want the world, police, white men, employers and others to value + respect “us”, our women, and teens then we have to start expecting those who look like “us” to do the same, even in their art…Beyonce should use her power and influence to teach girls how to do what is right…not send mixed messages that will leave those who unfortunately don’t have strong parental figures thinking that they need to be “drankin”, a female hustler/thug…or dressed like a whore if a white man got on TV and said this is who black girls are or need to be there would be black outrage. Beyonce and others like her, reality show stars, female rappers, male rappers, etc. should be held to an even higher standard because they are hurting “their own”.

  3. Not only does beyonce influence women in a bad way, white women do also.ive never seen so much garbage in this country, we have turned into nothing but a country of hores male and female.no respect on either side.tv, internet all garbage for our young people.no respect and no value on human life in this country, and its a shame.beyonce can get half naked for her husband at home, we dont wanna see her half naked on national tv.appears shes prostituting tv and the rest of the reality babes and men to.our standards have become to low, if your raised in a good home parents will remind you of your standards.

  4. VirilisAfricanum on said:

    I completely agree with Val Robinson and Jacqueline Perry’s comments…I think they are both right on target.

    In my opinion, the larger issue that Our Women are experiencing is, to borrow a line from Chris Rock, like a “civil war” amongst black women. There is a fight on, and it’s for the future of Black female identity. What it will mean to be a black woman in 20 years, how society will view them, is being shaped right now. The single-mindedness of what was once the pillars of our community are quickly disappearing, giving way to the “everything is okay”, “you do you, only live for moment” humanistic mentality; which is also encouraged by the media.

    We can no longer heavily rely on those institutions (the church, the sorority, the lodge, the teams and clubs, etc…) as beacons of morality and decency that will help us guide our girls through those rough waters into adulthood. Our girls are getting mixed signals on every front. The problem with the Beyoncé and Rihanna type is that they think that a woman’s power lies in her sexuality. To put it another way, “power is in the – well, lets just say, the other p-word with 5 letters”. Obviously this approach is seriously flawed on so many levels.
    One the other end of the spectrum, there are those mothers and female role models who are fighting the good fight, investing their time and energy into these young folks. Or even, just carrying themselves in a respectable manner because they know some young woman is looking at them as an example.

    I see it with the young men, the sagging pants, thug wannabe mentality. I do my part in modeling appropriate behaviors, but I’m under illusions about the forces I’m up against. It’s too bad Beyoncé can’t see the 65 year-old Beyoncé of the future, I wonder advice she would give herself.

  5. val robinson on said:

    Not for women, because women are grown! Kids and young girls, yes. I wonder if she would want Blue Ivy looking at that.

  6. Yes, not only beyonce but the reality shows and just tv in general.beyonce is a mother a needs to carry herself in that manner, appears shes not only singing but advertising women in a slutty manner.black women we dont have to do all this to get a man or a husband.find a job, be respectable and if its meant to be it will be, learn to love yourself and respect yourself, and you will get it back.

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