FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Gov. Jay Nixon on Thursday ordered the Missouri National Guard to begin withdrawing from Ferguson, where nightly scenes of unrest have erupted since a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old nearly two weeks ago.

Since the guard’s arrival Monday, flare-ups in the small section of town that had been the center of nightly unrest have begun to subside. The quietest night was overnight Wednesday and Thursday, when police arrested only a handful of people in the protest zone.

“As we continue to see improvement, I have ordered the Missouri National Guard to begin a systematic process of withdrawing from the City of Ferguson,” the governor said in a statement.

Demonstrations began after the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown, and authorities have arrested at least 163 people in the protest area. Data provided Thursday by St. Louis County showed that while the majority of those arrested are Missourians, just seven live in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb. The vast majority, 128 people, were cited for failure to disperse. Twenty-one face burglary-related charges.

Meanwhile Thursday, St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch reiterated he has no intentions of removing himself from the case, and he urged Nixon to once and for all decide if he will act on calls for McCulloch’s ouster.

Some question McCulloch’s ability to be unbiased since his father, mother and other relatives worked for St. Louis police. His father was killed while responding to a call involving a black suspect.

Nixon said this week he is not asking McCulloch to recuse himself. But a McCulloch aide, Ed Magee, said the governor ‘didn’t take an actual position one way or the other.”

McCulloch called for a more definitive decision. He said in a statement that Nixon must “end this distraction” or risk delay in resolution of the investigation.

A Nixon spokesman did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

Federal authorities have launched an independent investigation into Brown’s death, and U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill told The Associated Press that all of the physical evidence from the case was being flown Thursday from St. Louis to the FBI forensics lab in Quantico, Virginia. The evidence includes shell casings and trajectories, blood patterns and clothing, the Missouri Democrat said.

“The only thing you have to test the credibility of eye witnesses to a shooting like this is in fact the physical evidence,” McCaskill said. “I’m hopeful the forensic evidence will be clear and will shed a lot more light on what the facts were.”

McCaskill also announced that next month she will lead a Senate hearing to look into the militarization of local police departments after criticism of the law enforcement response to the protests in Ferguson following Brown’s death.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson, in charge of securing Ferguson, said just six people were arrested at protests Wednesday night, compared to 47 the previous night, providing hope among law enforcement leaders that tensions may be beginning to ease.

A grand jury on Wednesday began considering evidence to determine whether the officer who shot Brown, Darren Wilson, should be charged. Magee said there was no timeline for the process, but it could take weeks.

Another fatal police-involved shooting happened this week in St. Louis, about five miles from the site where Brown was killed. St. Louis police released video showing officers killing a knife-wielding man. The video shows the man saying, “Kill me now” as he moved toward two officers. The officers fired six shots each, killing 25-year-old Kajieme Powell.

The St. Louis shooting briefly spurred a gathering of about 150 people who chanted, “Hands up, don’t shoot,” a chant that has become common among protesters in Ferguson.

St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson said he wanted to move quickly to make public as much information as possible. By Wednesday he had provided media with cellphone video of the shooting, the 911 call, dispatch tapes and surveillance video from a nearby store.

“I think the lessons learned from Ferguson were so crystal clear,” Dotson said.

3 thoughts on “Gov. Nixon Taking National Guard Out of Ferguson

  1. If the story has happenedin this way, that’s mean it is the right moment for civilians, to ask ‘’what isgoing on by now in America’’? In 2014, is just because some guys in uniform belongto whatever instance would be allowed to step on human dignity like this?According to the new details, the homicide of the officer Wilson and of coursethe wrong behavior of his squad toward the population apparently isn’t only aracial mishandling mime-drama it’s above all a Human Concern to correctstrictly nowadays. As a free speaking bystander, it seems this kind ofuniformed guys deserve to be sent to fighting in Afghanistan or Iraq, not in theUS territories. Wake up America! ———— Justice is not anexpression of encouragement; it’s more a mental dehydration becomes legallycommencing the undeniable or imperative necessities in the approach ofMississippi or Ferguson expanses. Eligible for any society especially thatwhich is lacking such as Missouri, from yesteryear to the momentum. http://www.artnook.weebly.com

  2. They never should have been brought in! He should have done his job and suspended him without pay first of all. It’s a laundry list of what needs to be done with that situation, but as long as a bunch of Racist (mayor of ferguson, chief of police – county and ferguson and McCullough) are making decisions things will never change

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