VA Scandal Deepens; Calls for Shineski To Resign

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“Our performance measures have become our goals, not tools to help us understand where we needed to invest resources,” he told the House Veterans Affairs Committee late Wednesday. “We undermined the integrity of our data when we elevated our performance measures to goals.”

The IG’s report said problems identified by investigators were not new. The IG’s office has issued 18 reports to George W. Bush and Obama administrations as well as Congress since 2005.

Griffin said investigators’ next steps include determining whether names of veterans awaiting care were purposely omitted from electronic waiting lists and at whose direction and whether any deaths were related to delays in care.

He said investigators at some of the 42 facilities “have identified instances of manipulation of VA data that distort the legitimacy of reported waiting times.” The IG said investigators are making surprise visits, a step that could reduce “the risk of destruction of evidence, manipulation of data, and coaching staff on how to respond to our interview questions.”

Justice Department officials have already been brought into cases where there is evidence of a criminal or civil violation, Griffin said.

Dr. Samuel Foote, a former clinic director for the VA in Phoenix who was the first to bring the allegations to light, said the findings were no surprise.

“I knew about all of this all along,” Foote told The Associated Press in an interview. “The only thing I can say is you can’t celebrate the fact that vets were being denied care.”

Foote took issue with the finding by the inspector general that patients had, on average, waited 115 days for their first medical appointment.

“I don’t think that number is correct. It was much longer,” he said. “It seemed to us to be about six months.”

Still, Foote said it is good that the VA finally appears to be addressing some long-standing problems.

“Everybody has been gaming the system for a long time,” he said. “Phoenix just took it to another level. … The magnitude of the problem nationwide is just so huge, so it’s hard for most people to get a grasp on it.”

The report Wednesday said 84 percent of a statistical sample of 226 veterans at the Phoenix hospital waited more than 14 days to get a primary care appointment. A fourth of the 226 received some level of care during the interim, such as in the emergency room or at a walk-in clinic, the report said.

In a related matter, Griffin said investigators have received numerous allegations of mismanagement, inappropriate hiring decisions, sexual harassment and bullying behavior by mid- and senior-level managers at the Phoenix hospital. Investigators were assessing the validity of the complaints and their effect, if any, on patients’ access to care, he said.
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