Santa’s Shade: How a Fictional Character Represents Race in America

Comments: 6  | Leave A Comment
  • advertisement
  • PLAY AUDIO

    For iPad/iPhone:


    Remember just last week when we talked about the picture I posted on social media of the guy who looked like the popular depiction of Jesus selling Christmas trees in my neighborhood?

    Well this week I’ve been outdone by a Fox News anchor who emphatically stated not only that Jesus was white, but that Santa Claus is white too.

    Oh boy, that really got everyone up in arms. News columns were written, blogs, editorials. It became the lead story on the news channels. I even covered it on my own show on CNN.

    And after I played the Fox interview for the panel on my show, I somehow found it hard to control my laughter.

    I guess it was a confluence of events.  One was that I was actually discussing the topic on national television for obvious reasons.

    The other was, in the moment, the host’s emphasis on Santa’s race being white just struck me as funny, even absurd.

    Even more absurd was that no one on her show challenged her or even batted an eye to her Santa and Jesus are white declaration.

    But as someone who has been misquoted and misinterpreted, my first inkling was to cut the host some slack. If she meant that the traditional and popular depiction of Santa is white, then she is absolutely right.

    But that’s not what she said.

    Her quote was, “For all you kids watching at home Santa is just white.”

    A few days later she clarified by saying almost verbatim what I said; that she meant the popular depiction of Santa is white.

    Again, that was not her original statement.

    And that’s not what most people in the country heard.

    Even if we all got it wrong, there’s still something presumptive about her original statement.

    It presumes white as the default race in a country with rapidly shifting demographics.

    I won’t go into too much history on Santa but the person who Santa is based on, St. Nicholas, he was Greek and from a part of the world now known as southern Turkey – not a place of fair-skinned rosy cheeked people who look like the current popular versions of Santa.

    The news anchor later said she was surprised that her off-hand comment spoken in jest became a national firestorm.

    I’ll give her the benefit of the doubt and take her at her word.

    But what she should be aware of is that there’s a reason certain phrases become clichés.

    One of them goes like this, “many a truth is often spoken in jest.”

    And by saying what she said she may have unwittingly exposed a deeper truth not only about her own beliefs, but about many people’s beliefs in America- that Santa is and should be just like them- white.

    Tags: » »

    • More Related Content

    Comments

    6 thoughts on “Santa’s Shade: How a Fictional Character Represents Race in America

    1. Here is something that dropped in my spirit. The Bible says, Those that worship must worship in Spirit and truth! When we say Jesus born 25th is it truth? If Santa is a lie, then we certainly can’t be worshipping in Spirit and Truth!

    2. look up Christmas and you will find out where it comes from! it’s comes from catholics…christ mass! turned into christmas. Jesus wasn’t even born on the 25th. Why do we stamp Jesus on everything and call it christian? watch we celebrate!!

    3. Wonderful that, one week before Christmas, the commentator states that “Santa is fictional.” Just lovely. Hope no one’s child came down the stairs with a nightmare while his parents had CNN on. Good grief adults…don’t you think we already know that? Why say it so a child could possibly hear?

    4. There’s no such thing as santa claus! Christmas is bout celebratin th birth of Jesus Christ NOT an unreal character! Y is any1 even debatin this?!

    5. Who ever puts the gifts under your tree whether they are BLACK, Latino, or Asian….that’s who Santa Claus is. The bigger point of this whole topic is that contrary to SOME people’s belief….not every one is this country is lily white. To the original (Black) lady that put the point forward; people of color want to see reflections of themselves (especially kids)

    Add Your Comment

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s