Obama’s Kenyan-Born Uncle Allowed to Remain in US

Comments: 2  | Leave A Comment
  • advertisement
  • BOSTON (AP) — President Barack Obama‘s Kenyan-born uncle, who ignored a deportation order more than two decades ago, on Tuesday was granted permission to stay in the United States.

    Judge Leonard Shapiro made the decision after Onyango Obama, 69, testified that he had lived in the U.S. for 50 years, been a hard worker, paid income tax and been arrested only once.

    Asked about his family in the U.S., he said he has a sister and two nieces, then added, “I do have a nephew.” Asked to name the nephew, he said, “Barack Obama,” then added, “He’s the president of the United States.”

    Onyango Obama, the half brother of the president’s late father, testified he has lived in the U.S. since 1963, when he entered on a student visa. He had a series of immigration hearings in the 1980s and was ordered to leave the country in 1992 but remained.

    During his testimony, he identified himself as Obama Okech Onyango. Court records and authorities have identified him as Onyango Obama, and no explanation was given for the discrepancy.

    Obama told the judge he had led a quiet, simple life, graduating from high school in Cambridge, then attending Boston University, where he received a degree in philosophy. He said he has worked for years as a manager at a family-owned liquor store in Framingham, just west of Boston. He also said he has worked for decades to help African immigrants find housing and settle in the U.S.

    The judge, while announcing his decision, cited a law that entitles immigrants who are “out of status” to become permanent residents if they arrived in the U.S. before 1972, maintained continuous residence and are of good moral character.

    Obama testified he hasn’t been back to Kenya since he entered the U.S. and said it would be difficult for him to return after all these years.

    “Mr. Judge, America is a land of opportunities, a land of chances,” he said in a thick accent.

    His immigration status didn’t become public until his 2011 drunken-driving arrest in Framingham. Police said after the arrest he told them, “I think I will call the White House.”

    Asked about the exchange by a prosecutor on Tuesday, he said he might have said that but couldn’t recall.

    The charge was dismissed after he completed a year of probation and 14 weeks of alcohol education classes.

    1 2Next page »

    Tags: »

    • More Related Content

    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 2,164 other followers