Whooping Cough Shot Cuts Illness, Not Spread

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The baboons didn’t get sick, but they had high levels of bacteria in their respiratory system for five weeks — which suggest they were contagious for about that long. Some baboons given the old vaccine had low levels after only two weeks.

That’s a big deal finding because it was thought that people only spread the disease when they had coughs and other symptoms, said Dr. Erik Hewlett, a University of Virginia whooping cough researcher who was not involved in the FDA study but has collaborated with Merkel.

Health officials have sought to protect small children by vaccinating the people who are in contact with them such as grandparents and baby sitters— a strategy called “cocooning.” But that may not work as well as hoped if infected people who don’t show any symptoms can still spread it, the research suggests.

“This is a whole new way of thinking of the problem,” Hewlett said.

Still, cocooning is better than nothing. An infected person with a cough is probably spreading more germs that someone who spreads it through talking or exhaling, said the FDA’s Merkel.

The study was published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Versions of the vaccine are made by two companies — Sanofi Pasteur and GlaxoSmithKline. A GSK spokesman said the company didn’t have enough information on the study to comment. Sanofi said in a statement that it’s not clear how well the findings translate to humans, and that many factors may contribute to recent surges in whooping cough. It also said the research contains “valuable information” and points to areas for further study.

(Photo: AP)

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