Black Twitter Slams NY Times Writer Who Thinks We Need To Explain Twerking To Our Parents

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  • black-twitter-twerkWhen opinion writers from The NY Times decide to write about “twerking,” in a satirical essay riddled with a few questionable one liners, Black people get angry. Not just regular angry, but the type of angry that boldly @’s you on Twitter, demanding an explanation of words strung together for a powerfully painful sentence like this one:

    “Explain that twerking is a dance move typically associated with lower-income African-American women that involves the rapid gyration of the hips in a fashion that prominently exhibits the elasticity of the gluteal musculature.”

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    From this satirical piece, an #AskTeddyWayne hashtag was born. By the looks of these hilarious tweets, I’ll say that Black Twitter strike again! Check out some of the tweets:

    While I am still giggling at many of these tweets, I can’t help but feel that Black people, specifically Black Twitter, cannot wait to be offended by something, causing an uproar, or rather a hilarious hashtag to take the internet by storm. While Teddy Wayne’s words about lower-income Black women are ignorant, they’re partly true and SATIRICAL!

    Case in point–you will never in your life see Michelle Obama, Oprah or Ursula Burns twerking. But you will see Amber Rose, Tayquisha or the the like doing it all over social media. Miley Cyrus’ sudden interest in [bad] twerking is perplexing. While she’s in the tax bracket closer to Michelle Obama’s than Amber Rose’s, she’s chosen to engage in Black culture in a way that many Black people find offensive, myself included. According to xoJane, “Miley picks the parts of Black culture that suit her agenda and tickle her taste buds.”

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