Little Known Black History Fact: The Fearn Plantation

Comments: 3  | Leave A Comment
  • advertisement
  • PLAY AUDIO

    Fearn Plantation in Danville, Virginia was the last capital of the Confederacy. Thomas Fearn purchased the land in 1783 from William Wynn, both of whom were founders of Danville, Virginia. On the land is a historic cemetery where a tombstone still reads “Fearn’s Burying Ground.” A single chimney and artifacts of a slave house still inhabit the grounds at Fearn, including the graves at the cemetery.

    The Fearn Plantation was home to thousands of slaves who took care of the 1,200 acres of land. Through their servitude, the slaves of Fearn were key in building the booming tobacco market of Virginia. The site has been added to the Remembering Slavery, Resistance, and Freedom Project through the College of William and Mary and the Martin Luther King Memorial Commission of the Virginia General Assembly.

    Although the plantation is family history to many Virginia blacks, the city is planning to sell the land to a Chinese manufacturer. There are plans to build a furniture assembly plant on the Fearn Plantation historic grounds.

    1 2 Next page »

    Tags: » »

    • More Related Content

    Comments

    3 thoughts on “Little Known Black History Fact: The Fearn Plantation

    1. If the city sells the land that black folks were slaves and was not paid for their labor. The money from the sell of the land should go to an historical black college.

    2. Sorry but your story is a bit off or misleading, The Fearn Plantation was not the last capital of the Confederacy.

      Danville became the last headquarters of the Confederate States of America within the space of a few days. Jefferson Davis stayed at the palatial home of William T. Sutherlin on April 3, 1865. It was in the Sutherlin home that Davis’ issued his final Presidential Proclamation. The final Confederate Cabinet meeting was held at the Benedict House (later destroyed) in Danville. Davis and members of his cabinet remained there until April 10, 1865, when news of Lee’s surrender forced them to flee southward. On the day of their departure, Governor William Smith arrived from Lynchburg, to establish his headquarters.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danville,_Virginia

      That however doesn’t demise the importance of this site.

    Add Your Comment

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s