Conn. Chimp Victim Denied $150M State Lawsuit

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  • HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut woman disfigured by a friend’s pet chimpanzee in 2009 was denied permission Friday to sue the state for $150 million on her claim that officials knew the animal was dangerous but didn’t do anything about it.

    The state claims commissioner released a five-page decision approving the state’s motion to dismiss Charla Nash’s claim, saying the law at the time allowed private ownership of chimpanzees and didn’t require officials to seize legal animals. The state generally is immune to lawsuits, unless allowed by the claims commissioner.

    Nash was blinded, lost both hands and underwent a face transplant after being mauled in Stamford in 2009. She reached a $4 million settlement last year with the estate of chimp owner Sandra Herold, who died in 2010.

    Messages seeking comment were left Friday with Nash’s relatives and her lawyer. They can appeal the decision by Claims Commissioner J. Paul Vance Jr. to the legislature.

    Nash’s lawyer, Charles Willinger, has said the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection should be held responsible for not seizing the animal before the attack, because it had been warned that the animal was dangerous.

    State Attorney General George Jepsen said the state shouldn’t be held liable.

    “While we have the utmost sympathy for Charla Nash, we agree with the claims commission that a regulatory statute does not provide a basis to sue the state,” Jepsen spokeswoman Jaclyn Falkowski said. “To decide otherwise would mean that the state simply could not afford to pass regulations intended to promote order and safety.”

    Vance said in his decision: “At the time Ms. Nash was attacked, there was no statute that prohibited the private ownership of the chimpanzee nor was there any statutory language that would have created a duty to Ms. Nash.”

    He added, “If there was a failure by the DEP to seize the animal … the duty owed was to the general public and does not create a statutory obligation to ensure the safety of a private individual such as (Nash).”

    State lawmakers did approve a ban on chimpanzees and other animals deemed dangerous a few months after Nash was mauled.

    Nash, now 59, had gone to Herold’s home on Feb. 16, 2009, to help lure her friend’s 200-pound chimpanzee, Travis, back inside. But the chimp went berserk and ripped off Nash’s nose, lips, eyelids and hands before being shot to death by a police officer. Nash now lives in a nursing home outside Boston.

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