Has a Saudi Court taken an eye for eye too far?  A reported Saudi Arabia court ruling has sentenced a man to be paralyzed as retribution for having paralyzed another man. Rights group Amnesty International calls it “outrageous.”

“Paralyzing someone as punishment for a crime would be torture,” said Ann Harrison, Amnesty International’s Middle East and North Africa deputy director tells CNN.

The Saudi Gazette, an English language daily paper, reported that Ali Al-Khawahir would be sentenced to paralysis for stabbing and paralyzing his best fried 10 years ago at the age of 14, if he cannot come with one million Saudi Riyals ($266,009) in compensation to the victim.

“If implemented, the paralysis sentence would contravene the U.N. Convention against Torture to which Saudi Arabia is a state party and the Principles of Medical Ethics adopted by the UN General Assembly,” Amnesty International said.

Paralysis is not the only brutal punishment that has been passed. Add eye-gouging, tooth extraction, and death to the list. Furthermore, this is not the first time a paralysis as punishment sentence has made headlines in Saudi Arabia.

In 2010, local media reported the case of a 22-year-old man who was paralyzed in a fight requested paralysis as punishment for the man he’d fought with.

The Saudi Ministry of Justice denied paralysis had ever been considered as punishment in that case.

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